Empidonax oberholseri
(Dusky Flycatcher)


Order: Passeriformes
Order Description: Passerines
Family: Tyrannidae
Family Description: Tyrant Flycatchers

Physical Description:
Size: 5.25-6" (13-15cm). Dark gray above (maybe with a slight olive tinge). buffClick word for definition throat and breast. Belly pale yellow. Thin white eye ring and wing bars.

Similar Species- Most Empidonax flycatchers are so similar in appearance that it is nearly impossible to tell them apart be sight alone without a bird in hand. Luckily, their songs and calls along with habitat are good diagnostics.

Song:
A three-parted Trip-per-Wheet! with the last note higher. Note is a dry Whit!

Distribution:
Breeds from portions of western Canada and western U.S., south to southern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, central Arizona, and central and northeastern New Mexico. Winters from southern California (casually), southern Arizona, and northern Mexico, south (mostly in highlands), to portions of Mexico, and casually south to northwestern Guatemala.

Habitat:
Found in brushy habitat, thickets, open coniferousClick word for definition forests, mountain chaparralClick word for definition, aspen groves, and cottonwood forests. Often found near water. During migrationClick word for definition and in winter, found in deserts. In preliminary results of Montana-Idaho study, species was found to be associated with rotation-aged Douglas-fir stands.

Diet:
Eats insects.

Ecology:
Builds cup-shaped nest in shrub or tree (frequently juniper or sage). Hunts from perch, or forages in foliage.

Reproduction:
Both sexes incubateClick word for definition 3- 4 eggs (usually), for 12-15 days. Young are tended by both adults, and leave nest about 18 days after hatching.

Conservation:
Element Code: ABPAE33090
Status: Protected nongame species
Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S5
National Rank: N5B, NZN

Important State References:
Hejl, S.J. and R.E. Woods. 1990. Bird assemblages in old-growth and rotation-aged Douglas-fir/Ponderosa pine stands in the northern Rocky Mountains: a preliminary assessment. Pp. 93-100 in D.M. Baumgartner and J.E. Lotan, eds., Proceedings of a Symposium on Interior Douglas-fir: the species and its management. Feb. 27, 1990, Spokane WA.


Design by Ean Harker©1999, 2000.
Written by Jason Karl, 2000.